Derren Brown: Secret

Thalia and Melpomene

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY thru THURSDAY @ 7 PM
FRIDAY & SATURDAY @ 8 PM
SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

September 06, 2019 - January 04, 2020

Upcoming Scheduled Events

No scheduled performances found.

Running Time

2:30 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

From stage to screen, two-time Olivier Award winner Derren Brown has mesmerized millions worldwide with his unique brand of mind reading, persuasion, and psychological illusion. Now, for the first time ever, this U.K. phenomenon and Netflix star brings his talents to Broadway.

After a sold-out, critically acclaimed run off-Broadway at the Atlantic Theater CompanyDerren Brown: Secret returns with a spellbinding experience that dares us — in the most jaw-dropping way — to take a closer look at the stories and beliefs that guide our lives.

Behold a theatrical event of the mind in this “thrilling spectacle of psychological magic” - Entertainment Weekly

Audience Advisory

This production contains haze, strobe lighting, and subliminal messages There is a cerebral nature to the performance and the duration of the show may cause issues with concentration.

Tickets


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Standard Tickets


September 06, 2019 - January 04, 2020

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

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Theatre Details

Address

Cort Theatre
138 W 48th St
New York, NY 10036

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Public Transportation

By Subway: F to 47-49 St./ Rockefeller Center

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Six ADA compliant viewing locations with companion seating. Transfer optional.

Seating: Mezzanine, balcony, and lower lounge reached only by stairs. Seats 1,083.

Elevator\Escalator: None.

Parking: Valet parking garage: Next door. No vans.

Curb Ramps: SE corner 48th St. & 7th Ave; SW corner of 48th St. & 6th Ave; Driveways on either side of theater.

Entrance: Double doors in series: 1st set (each 26.5") has one pair of automatic doors from 48th Street to ticket lobby with push-button control; 2nd set (each 26.5", attended by ushers) to Orchestra.

Box Office: Ticket lobby. Counter 43". Accessible pass-through with writing shelf at 32". Assistance available

Restroom: Womens and Mens: Lower level. Down seventeen steps.

Water Fountain: Rear orchestra, house left. Spout 36".

Telephone: Ticket lobby. Coin slot 54". Cord Length 29". With TTY and electric outlet.

Assisted Listening System: Reservations are not necessary. Drivers license or ID with printed address required as a deposit. Please call: (212) 582-7678 to reserve in advance.

Visual Assistance: None.

Folding Armrests: Eleven row-end seats with folding armrests.

Reviews (3)

J.J. Abrams and 'Hamilton' director Thomas Kail are among the producers of this debut Broadway appearance by the two-time Olivier-winning British mentalist.The eponymous star doesn't make it easy on reviewers when it comes to writing about the Broadway production of Derren Brown: Secret.  "Don't talk about anything that happens in the show," the British mentalist urges audience members and any journalists in attendance at the beginning of the evening. At least, I think he says that. Frankly, after being manipulated by this master of psychological illusion for two-and-a-half hours, I don't really trust any of my perceptions anymore.

CONTINUE READING THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW

Critic's Pick -

The current incarnation of that show, directed by Andrew O’Connor and Andy Nyman (and written by them and Mr. Brown), is expert in creating that most essential of theatrical illusions, that everything we see is occurring for the first time. The show feels, if anything, more at home — and oddly, more intimate — in a Broadway palace than it did in a house many times smaller.” 

CONTINUE READING THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

He also personalizes the patter by talking about coming out as a gay man at 31, the first of many revelations of the show, which build gradually in surprise until the final secret is shown. It’s a jaw-dropping, multi-layered reveal with a kicker of a coda. If minds aren’t totally blown, they’re at least scrambled for a while. Even cynical New Yorkers will be at least momentarily stunned.

CONTINUE READING THE VARIETY REVIEW