The Cher Show

1970s looking title treatment that reads the Cher Show

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY & THURSDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY @ 8 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

November 01, 2018 - Open Run

Upcoming Scheduled Events

No scheduled performances found.

Running Time

2:20 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

The Cher Show is based on the life of Cherilyn Sarkisian La Piere Bono Allman or as her friends call her, Cher!

The kid on a tricycle, vowing to be famous. The teenage phenom who crashes by twenty. The glam TV star who quits at the top. The would-be actress with an Oscar. The rock goddess with a hundred million records sold. The legend who's done it all, still scared to walk on stage. The wife, mother, daughter, sister, friend. The woman, looking for love. The ultimate survivor, chasing her dream.

They're all here, dressed to kill, singing their asses off, telling it like it is. And they're all the star of The Cher Show.

This new musical will feature her beloved chart-topping hits, including "If I Could Turn Back Time," "Believe," "I Got You Babe," "Strong Enough," "Half Breed," "I Found Someone," "A Different Kind of Love Song," "Take Me Home," and "Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves."

Tickets


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Standard Tickets


November 01, 2018 - Open Run

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

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Theatre Details

Address

Neil Simon Theatre
250 W 52nd St
New York, NY 10019

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Public Transportation

By Subway: 1, C, E to 50th Street

By Bus: Take the M7, M20, M50, or M104 bus.

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: One location at extreme side of orchestra. Patron purchases aisle seat and adjacent seat. Transfer optional.

Seating: Orchestra on ground level. Mezzanine and lounges reached only by stairs.Seats 1,334.

Elevator\Escalator: There are no elevators or escalators at this theatre.

Parking: Valet parking garage: Broadway & 52nd St.

Curb Ramps: SW corner of 52nd St. & Broadway; SE corner of 52nd Street & 8th Ave.

Entrance: Double doors in series: 1st set (each 29.5") to outer lobby; slope down to 2nd set (each 30") to inner lobby. Incline (1:10) to orchestra level.

Box Office: Outer lobby. Counter 46.5".

Restroom: Unisex: Orchestra level.

Water Fountain: Lower lounge, in restrooms.

Telephone: Lower lounge.

Assisted Listening System: Infrared. Occasional sign language interpreted performances.

Reviews (3)

Whenever you see Madonna reinvent herself, or Lady Gaga grab headlines with an audacious outfit, you should think of Cher: The Goddess of Pop was perfecting that act decades before either of them. Now, Broadway audiences can revisit her half-century career in The Cher Show, the new jukebox musical at the Neil Simon Theatre. With a book by Rick Elice (Jersey Boys) and direction by Jason Moore (Avenue Q), it doesn't reinvent the wheel, but it does avoid some of the nastier potholes of the bio-musical form while driving home a sequin-studded spectacle

CONTINUE READING THE THEATERMANIA REVIEW

The Cher Show also has the distinct advantage of the boss being behind the beaded curtain as a producer, lending a personal investment that carries it through the rough patches and choppy storytelling of Rick Elice's uneven book. There's an authentic emotional charge in "You Haven't Seen the Last of Me Yet," an anthem of empowered resilience smartly repurposed from the 2010 big-screen travesty, Burlesque. For all its flaws and unapologetic excesses, I had a blast at The Cher Show, as will any fan.

CONTINUE READING THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Yet it can’t be said that The Cher Show doesn’t provide what it promises: Cher, Cher and more Cher. The costumes, by the star’s real-life coutourier Bob Mackie (who is also a character in the show, played affably by Michael Berresse), are simply sensational, ranging from the nostalgia trippiness of the 1960s to the famous feathered get-up of the 1986 Oscars and a full-on fashion show of outré gowns that would be the envy of any RuPaul’s Drag Race finale. 

CONTINUE READING THE TIME OUT NEW YORK REVIEW