Ink

Thalia and Melpomene

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY thru SATURDAY @ 8 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY & SUNDAY @ 2 PM

Run Dates

March 14, 2019 - July 07, 2019

Upcoming Scheduled Events

June 22, 2019

Running Time

2:45 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

It’s 1969 London.

The brash young Rupert Murdoch (Bertie Carvel) purchases a struggling paper, The Sun, and sets out to make it a must-read smash which will destroy - and ultimately horrify - the competition. He brings on rogue editor Larry Lamb (Jonny Lee Miller) who in turn recruits an unlikely team of underdog reporters. Together, they will go to any lengths for success and the race for the most ink is on!

Inspired by real events and a recent hit in London’s West End, James Graham’s electrifying new play comes to Broadway in the exhilarating Almeida Theatre production, directed by Rupert Goold.

In its London run, The Guardian called it “riveting,” and Time Out hailed it as “an incredibly brilliant stunner.”

Tickets


34 Shows fit your search criteria

Standard Tickets


March 14, 2019 - July 07, 2019

Wheelchair seating is always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Audio Description: Live Tickets


June 22, 2019

Saturday @ 2:00 PM

A pre-performance touch tour will take place 12:00-12:30pm


Theatre Details

Address

Samuel J. Friedman Theatre
261 W 47th St
New York, NY 10036

View Larger Map

Public Transportation

By Bus: M104, M10, M27/M50, M6, M7, or M42

By Subway: N, R, W to 49th St or 1, 9 to 50th St, walk south to 47th St and west to the theatre C, E to 50th St, walk south to 47th St and east to the theatre.

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: 8 seats available for wheelchair seating.

Elevator\Escalator: An elevator is available to take you to all levels of the theatre.

Parking: Central Parking System, 257 West 47th St (Broadway and 8th Ave). Call (212) 262-9778

Box Office: Mon, Tues, Thur, Fri: Noon to 8 pm Wed: Noon to 8 pm (If there is a matinee, 10 am to 8 pm) Sat: 10 am to 8 pm Sun: 10 am to 7 pm

Restroom: The restrooms are wheelchair accessible and located on the lower level and Mezzanine level.

Water Fountain: Water fountain is accessible at 36" AFF.

Telephone: On lower and Mezzanine levels.

Reviews (3)

NYT Critic's Pick

Directed with vaudevillian flair and firecracker snap by Goold...The first act abounds in adrenaline...'Ink' proposes that the sensibility that would generate today’s tidal wave of social media originated with early London-era Murdoch. At the same time, this production is steeped in a gritty nostalgia for the end of a chapter in journalism...The largely American, multicast ensemble deploys varyingly confident British accents. But it does well in sustaining the play’s propulsive momentum

CONTINUE READING THE NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW

Four stars **** Goold’s characteristically flashy direction...Lamb, played with both increasingly aggressive intensity and a palpable sense of inner conflict by an excellent Miller pursues that goal with a vengeance...But Graham, and Carvel, know better than to make Murdoch a...two-dimensional villain, for that matter...Superb cast...If it’s too late to kill the beast Murdoch has nourished over decades, ‘Ink’ at least encourages us to reflect on its growth—and, if we’re fair, our own accountability in that.”

CONTINUE READING THE NEW YORK STAGE REVIEW

Bertie Carvel won the Olivier award for this performance and he is mesmerizing - slouched and uncouth, his Murdoch speaks with the confidence of a snake oil salesman and you can’t take your eyes off him, except when he’s sharing the stage with the equally excellent Jonny Lee Miller as the unsung visionary, the Yin to Murdoch’s Yang behind the Sun’s success.Director Rupert Goold’s own vision for the play is an inspired antic Marx Brothers style romp complete with silly songs, choreography and set pieces incongruously piled to the rafters. The perfect metaphor for a guy who thumbed his nose at the establishment.

CONTINUE READING THE NY1 REVIEW