Grand Horizons

A close up on a face. An older woman's mouth and nose are the focus, her hands and rose-tinted glasses are slightly out of frame.

Show Details

Performance Schedule

TUESDAY & THURSDAY @ 7 PM
WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY & SATURDAY @ 8 PM
WEDNESDAY & SATURDAY @ 2 PM
SUNDAY @ 3 PM

Run Dates

December 23, 2019 - March 01, 2020

Upcoming Scheduled Events

No scheduled performances found.

Running Time

2:15 hrs

Read Reviews Visit Show Website

Show Description

Bill and Nancy have spent fifty full years as husband and wife. They practically breathe in unison, and can anticipate each other's every sigh, snore and sneeze. But just as they settle comfortably into their new home in Grand Horizons, the unthinkable happens: Nancy suddenly wants out.

As their two adult sons struggle to cope with the shocking news, they are forced to question everything they assumed about the people they thought they knew best. By turns funny, shocking and painfully honest, Bess Wohl's new play explores a family turned upside-down and takes an intimate look at the wild, unpredictable, and enduring nature of love. 

Tickets


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Standard Tickets


December 23, 2019 - March 01, 2020

Wheelchair seating and assistive listening devices are always available.

For Show Times, see Performance Schedule above.


Wheelchair

Use the standard ticket button to purchase tickets.

Hearing: Assistive Listening Devices

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Theatre Details

Address

Helen Hayes Theater
240 W 44th St
New York, NY 10036

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Public Transportation

By Bus: M42

By Subway: 1,2,3,7,S,A,C,E,N,R,Q,W to 42nd St./Times square

Additional Accessibility Details

Wheelchairs: Accessible seating in both Orchestra & Mezzanine

Seating: Orchestra on ground level. Seats 589.

Elevator\Escalator: Full-service/accessible elevator

Parking: Valet parking garages: 1st garage: South side of 44th St. between 6th & 7th Aves. Vertical clearance: 105". 2nd garage: East of Shubert Alley, on north side of 44th St. between Broadway & 8th Ave. No vans.

Curb Ramps: (2.5" lip) NW corner of 44th & Broadway; (2.5" lip) SE corner of 44th St. & Broadway; SW corner of 44th St. & Broadway.

Entrance: ADA-accessible building entrance at Stage Door. Handicap ramps in the lower lobby,

Box Office: Outer lobby, ground level. ADA access via the Stage Door.

Restroom: Accessible/unisex bathrooms/stalls in the lower lobby and at the mezzanine level

Water Fountain: Lower Level directly across from the elevator

Telephone: None on premises

Assisted Listening System: LOOP system in the auditorium, headsets available. Driver’s license or ID with printed address required as a deposit. Not available in the first 3 rows of the Orchestra.

Reviews (3)

What’s refreshing about “Grand Horizons” is how Wohl widens the scope beyond the immediate family to a winning degree, offering plum cameos for Maulik Pancholy as a late-night booty call for Brian gone wrong and for Priscilla Lopez as a fellow Grand Horizons resident who’s taken a shine to Bill.Yes, the humor can be as broad as a U-Haul truck. But “Grand Horizons” delivers old-fashioned entertainment that’s become a rarity on Broadway.

CONTINUE READING THE WRAP REVIEW

There are two foolproof comedy generators in Leigh Silverman’s production. No. 1: Jane Alexander cussing. Alexander is super-elegant. (You can sense from her stage presence that she was, for real, the chair of the NEA under Clinton.) Linda Cho costumes Nancy in beiges and diaphanous pink scarves—she’s a Wasp painted by Fragonard—but Nancy keeps cracking the façade. She shouts at a noisy neighbor with profane confidence; she confesses a long-ago affair in yonic detail. This leads us to comic strategy No. 2: Horrifying Michael Urie. His catalogue of reactions — shocked face, confused-but-still-listening face, the full-throated scoff, shaking information off like a wet dog, silent prayer — is a magician’s bag from which he draws and draws and never comes up empty

CONTINUE READING THE VULTURE REVIEW

Senior-citizen sex, know-it-all emotionally erratic kids, a looming divorce: It sounds like a pitch for a sitcom as opposed to the newest play from the writer of the somber Make Believe and the minimalist Small Mouth Sounds. Grand Horizons—produced by Second Stage, which commissioned and developed the play with Williamstown Theatre Festival, where Horizons premiered in July—may not be as weighty as some of Wohl’s other works, but it’s damn funny, and very on-point.

CONTINUE READING THE NEW YORK STAGE REVIEW